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08/17/08 - NNHS Newsletter -
Davy Crockett's 222nd Birthday

Let your tongue speak what your heart thinks.

 - Davy Crockett
(17 Aug 1786 - 06 Mar 1836)

Dear Friends and Schoolmates, 

     For today's Birthday Celebration Newsletter, all the hard work was done for me by our Wizard of Wonderment, bless his sweet heart!

         From Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA - 08/07/08 - "Birthday of Davy Crockett - 17 Aug":

My research indicates that you have never done a birthday newsletter for Davy Crockett (17 Aug 1786 - 6 Mar 1836).

Just Google for images of coonskin caps. There are many from which to choose.

BONUSES:

The Ballad was originally recorded by Bill Hayes. Here is Bill syncing it much later: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLa0OsPuM6k

Fess Parker also sang it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nOF4cq6qNc

Here is the vinyl version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mhWbU_6kFo&feature=related

   Thanks so much, Brown Eyes!

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HOMEWORK:

Homework list:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davy_Crockett
http://www.americanwest.com/pages/davycroc.htm
http://www.infoporium.com/heritage/crockbio.shtml
http://www.aboutfamouspeople.com/article1024.html

   Thanks again, David!

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ALERT - PRAYER ROLL:
   Spurred by continuing computer problems,
I have decided to reactivate a page originally suggested by      Frances Goodson Wang ('65) of MD on 01/22/04:

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/requests-prayers.html

   Hopefully, this will help address the problem in a number of ways.  Just don't forget to click on it each time!

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UPCOMING BIRTHDAYS:

   Happy Birthday tomorrow to Etta L. Baker ('57) AND Darlene Willis Marshall (Hampton HS - '68) of VA!

   Happy Birthday this week to:

19 -     Jimmy DeBerry ('64) of VA AND        Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA!

20 -
    Chip Clark ('65) of Northern VA AND Eddie Vest ('68) of VA;

21 -    Lynn Wright Hickman ('63) of VA;

23 -  Charles Allen ('57) AND         My Cousin, Cheryl White Wilson (John Marshall HS - '64) of VA! 

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/Happy-Birthday.html

   Many Happy Returns, One and All!

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  From Joe Drewry ('58) of VA - 08/10/08 - "Meet our NNHS 1958 Entrepreneur":

We have just celebrated or 50th High School Reunion.  Most of us are retired.  But, one of our lively, energetic classmates has recently embarked on a significant business expansion.
 
Congratulations to our NNHS 1958 Entrepreneur
   Gail Gaskins Roberson
 
For several years, Gail has owned and operated a successful  consignment shop in a shopping center at Sunset Beach, NC.  Several classmates have visited Gail 's shop in past years, and all were impressed with the well run, highly organized  business - aptly named "Bloomin'deals".
 
This past February, Gail finished moving her business to a new location in Calabash, NC.  At 6,500 sq. ft., the new, free-standing shop is more than 3 times as large as the previous business.  By all reports, business is booming in the new location and Bloomin'deals has already garnered its first business award.
 
Looking for a great place  to visit?  Check out Calabash - on the  Atlantic Ocean coast, just off RT 17, on the NC/SC border, between Wilmington and Myrtle Beach.  And stop in Bloomin'deals to say HI to our Typhoon classmate.
 
The Calabash Style -- Great seafood, shops, fishing, golf and history.
 
 
Scroll down to view some pix I recently took of Bloomin'deals:
 
Exterior view of Bloomin'deals
10001 Beach Drive
 Calabash, NC  26467
910-575-4949
Entering the main showroom Fireplace in main showroom Furniture and more in one of several showrooms Gail and Cody at entrance to main showroom Bloomin'deals received Best of Brunswick County award.
           
Typhoons Forever

   WOWZERONI!!! Thanks, Joe - and congratulations, Gail!

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From Norris Perry (Warwick HS - '59) of VA - 08/15/08 - "This is a true story":

(This is a true story and you can find out more by Googling Herman Rosenblat. He was Bar Mitzvahed at age 75)
 August 1942.  Piotrkow, Poland.
The sky was gloomy that morning as we waited anxiously. All the men, women and children of Piotrkow's Jewish ghetto had been herded into a square. 
Word had gotten around that we were being moved. My father had only recently died from typhus, which had run rampant through the crowded ghetto. 
My greatest fear was that our family would be separated.
'Whatever you do,' Isidore, my eldest brother, whispered to me, 'don't tell them your age. Say you're sixteen.'
I was tall for a boy of 11, so I could pull it off. That way I might be deemed valuable as a worker.
An SS man approached me, boots clicking against the cobblestones. He looked me up and down, and then asked my age.
'Sixteen,' I said. He directed me to the left, where my three brothers and other healthy young men already stood.
My mother was motioned to the right with the other women, children, sick and elderly people.
I whispered to Isidore, 'Why?'
He didn't answer. I ran to Mama's side and said I wanted to stay with her.
'No, 'she said sternly.
'Get away. Don't be a nuisance. Go with your brothers.'
She had never spoken so harshly before. But I understood: She was protecting me. She loved me so much that, just this once, she pretended not to. 
It was the last I ever saw of her.
My brothers and I were transported in a cattle car to Germany. We arrived at the Buchenwald concentration camp one night weeks later and were 
led into a crowded barrack. The next day, we were issued uniforms and identification numbers.
'Don't call me Herman anymore.' I said to my brothers. 'Call me 94983.'
I was put to work in the camp's crematorium, loading the dead into a hand-cranked elevator. I, too, felt dead. Hardened, I had become a number.
Soon, my brothers and I were sent to Schlieben, one of Buchenwald's sub-camps near Berlin .
One morning I thought I heard my mother's voice. 'Son,' she said softly but clearly, I am going to send you an angel.'
Then I woke up. Just a dream. A beautiful dream. But in this place there could be no angels. There was only work. And hunger. And fear.
A couple of days later, I was walking around the camp, around the barracks, near the barbed-wire fence where the guards could not easily see. I 
was alone.
On the other side of the fence, I spotted someone: a little girl with light, almost luminous curls. She was half-hidden behind a birch tree. I glanced 
around to make sure no one saw me. I called to her softly in German. 'Do you have something to eat?'
She didn't understand. I inched closer to the fence and repeated the question in Polish. Shestepped forward. I was thin and gaunt, with rags wrapped 
around my feet, but the girl looked unafraid. In her eyes, I saw life. She pulled an apple from her woolen jacket and threw it over the fence. 
I grabbed the fruit and, as I started to run away, I heard her say faintly, 'I'll see you tomorrow.'
I returned to the same spot by the fence at the same time every day. She was always there with something for me to eat - a hunk of bread or, better 
yet, an apple.
We didn't dare speak or linger. To be caught would mean death for us both. I didn't know anything about her, just a kind farm girl, except that she 
understood Polish. What was her name? Why was she risking her life for me?
Hope was in such short supply, and this girl on the other side of the fence gave me some, as nourishing in its way as the bread and apples.
Nearly seven months later, my brothers and I were crammed into a coal  car and shipped to Theresienstadt camp in  Czechoslovakia .
'Don't return,' I told the girl that day. 'We're leaving.' 
I turned toward the barracks and didn't look back, didn't even say good-bye to the little girl whose name I'd never learned, the girl with the apples.
We were in Theresienstadt for three months. The war was winding down and Allied forces were closing in, yet my fate seemed sealed. On May 10, 
1945, I was scheduled to die in the gas chamber at 10:00 AM.
In the quiet of dawn, I tried to prepare myself. So many times death seemed ready to claim me, but somehow I'd survived. Now, it was over. I thought 
of my parents. At least, I thought, we will be reunited.
But at 8 A.M. there was a commotion. I heard shouts, and saw people running every which way through camp. I caught up with my brothers. Russian 
troops had liberated the camp! The gates swung open. Everyone was running, so I did too. Amazingly, all of my brothers had survived; I'm not sure 
how. But I knew that the girl with the apples had been the key to my survival. In a place where evil seemed triumphant, one person's goodness had 
saved my life, had given me hope in a place where there was none. My mother had promised to send me an angel, and the angel had come.
Eventually I made my way to  England where I was sponsored by a Jewish charity, put up in a hostel with other boys who had survived the Holocaust 
and trained in electronics. Then I came to America, where my brother Sam had already moved. I served in the U. S. Army during the Korean War, 
and returned to  New York City after two years. By August 1957, I'd opened my own electronics repair shop. I was starting to settle in.
One day, my friend Sid who I knew from England called me. 'I've got a date. She's got a Polish friend. Let's double date.'
A blind date? Nah, that wasn't for me.
But Sid kept pestering me, and a few days later we headed up to the Bronx to pick up his date and her friend Roma.
I had to admit, for a blind date this wasn't so bad. Roma was a nurse at a  Bronx hospital. She was kind and smart. Beautiful, too, with swirling brown 
curls and green, almond-shaped eyes that sparkled with life. The four of us drove out to Coney Island. Roma was easy to talk to, easy to be with. 
Turned out she was wary of blind dates too!
We were both just doing our friends a favor. We took a stroll on the boardwalk, enjoying the salty Atlantic breeze, and then had dinner by the shore. 
I couldn't remember having a better time. We piled back into Sid's car, Roma and I sharing the backseat. As European Jews who had survived the 
war, we were aware that much had been left unsaid between us. 
She broached the subject, 'Where were you,' she asked softly, 'during the war?'
'The camps,' I said. The terrible memories still vivid, the irreparable loss. I had tried to forget. But you can never forget.
She nodded. 'My family was hiding on a farm in Germany , not far from Berlin ,' she told me. 'My father knew a priest, and he got us Aryan papers.' 
I imagined how she must have suffered too, fear, a constant companion. And yet here we were both survivors, in a new world.
'There was a camp next to the farm.' Roma continued. 'I saw a boy there and I would throw him apples every day.'
What an amazing coincidence that she had helped some other boy. 'What did he look like? I asked.
'He was tall, skinny, and hungry. I must have seen him every day for six months.'
My heart was racing. I couldn't believe it. This couldn't be.
'Did he tell you one day not to come back because he was leaving Schlieben?'
Roma looked at me in amazement. 'Yes!'
'That was me!'
I was ready to burst with joy and awe, flooded with emotions. I couldn't believe it! My angel.
'I'm not letting you go.' I said to Roma. And in the back of the car on that blind date, I proposed to her. I didn't want to wait.
'You're crazy!' she said. But she invited me to meet her parents for Shabbat dinner the following week. There was so much I looked forward 
to learning about Roma , but the most important things I always knew: her steadfastness, her goodness. For many months, in the worst of 
circumstances, she had come to the fence and given me hope. Now that I'd found her again, I could never let her go.
That day, she said yes. And I kept my word. After nearly 50 years of  marriage, two children and three grandchildren, I have never let her go.
 - Herman Rosenblat of Miami Beach,  Florida
This story is being made into a movie called The Fence.
   WOWZERONI-RINI!!! Thank you, Norris!  That's a perfect example of why I do not believe in 
"coincidence"!

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DATES TO REMEMBER:

1. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, September 26 - 28, 2008 - NNHS CLASS OF 1968:

     http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/reunion-class-of-1968.html - 03/31/08

2. Saturday, September 27, 2008 - EVERYONE:

     Evelyn Fryer Fish's Birthday Party for All of Us

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/09-30-06-EVELYNS-PARTY.html

http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/09-29-07-EVELYNS-PARTY.html

3. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, October 17 - 19, 2008 - NNHS CLASS OF 1963:

       http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com/reunion-class-of-1963.html  - 03/26/08

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  Y'all take care of each other!  TYPHOONS FOREVER!  We'll Always Have Buckroe!

                                  Love to all, Carol

==============================================

NNHS CLASS OF '65 WEB SITE: http://www.nnhs65.00freehost.com

PERSONAL WEB SITE: http://www.angelfire.com/weird2/cluckmeat

Carol Buckley Harty
219 Four Ply Lane
Fayetteville, NC 29311-9305  
910-488-9408
     
Official PayPal Seal
    To donate, click on the gold seal on the left, 
             or just mail it to my home. Thanks!

===================================

The Ballad of Davy Crockett

Words by Tom W. Blackburn
(23 June 1913 - 2 Aug 1992)

Music by George Bruns
(3 July 1914 - 23 May 1983)

(
Bill Hayes, 1955)


Born on a mountain top in Tennessee
greenest state in the land of the free
raised in the woods so he knew ev'ry tree
kilt him a b'ar when he was only three
Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier!

In eighteen thirteen the Creeks uprose
addin' redskin arrows to the country's woes
Now, Injun fightin' is somethin' he knows,
so he shoulders his rifle an' off he goes
Davy, Davy Crockett, the man who don't know fear!

Off through the woods he's a marchin' along
makin' up yarns an' a singin' a song
itchin' fer fightin' an' rightin' a wrong
he's ringy as a b'ar an' twict as strong
Davy, Davy Crockett, the buckskin buccaneer!

Andy Jackson is our gen'ral's name
his reg'lar soldiers we'll put to shame
Them redskin varmints us Volunteers'll tame
'cause we got the guns with the sure-fire aim
Davy, Davy Crockett, the champion of us all!~

Headed back to war from the ol' home place
but Red Stick was leadin' a merry chase
fightin' an' burnin' at a devil's pace
south to the swamps on the Florida Trace
Davy, Davy Crockett, trackin' the redskins down!

Fought single-handed through the Injun War
till the Creeks was whipped an' peace was in store
An' while he was handlin' this risky chore
made hisself a legend for evermore
Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier!

He give his word an' he give his hand
that his Injun friends could keep their land
An' the rest of his life he took the stand
that justice was due every redskin band
Davy, Davy Crockett, holdin' his promise dear!

Home fer the winter with his family
happy as squirrels in the ol' gum tree
bein' the father he wanted to be
close to his boys as the pod an' the pea
Davy, Davy Crockett, holdin' his young'uns dear!

But the ice went out an' the warm winds came
an' the meltin' snow showed tracks of game
An' the flowers of Spring filled the woods with flame
an' all of a sudden life got too tame
Davy, Davy Crockett, headin' on West again!

Off through the woods we're ridin' along
makin' up yarns an' singin' a song
He's ringy as a b'ar an' twict as strong
an' knows he's right 'cause he ain' often wrong
Davy, Davy Crockett, the man who don't know fear!

Lookin' fer a place where the air smells clean
where the trees is tall an' the grass is green
where the fish is fat in an untouched stream
an' the teemin' woods is a hunter's dream
Davy, Davy Crockett, lookin' fer Paradise!

Now he's lost his love an' his grief was gall
in his heart he wanted to leave it all
an' lose himself in the forests tall
but he answered instead his country's call
Davy, Davy Crockett, beginnin' his campaign!

Needin' his help they didn't vote blind
They put in Davy 'cause he was their kind
sent up to Nashville the best they could find
a fightin' spirit an' a thinkin' mind
Davy, Davy Crockett, choice of the whole frontier!

The votes were counted an' he won hands down
so they sent him off to Washin'ton town
with his best dress suit still his buckskins brown
a livin' legend of growin' renown
Davy, Davy Crockett, the Canebrake Congressman!

He went off to Congress an' served a spell
fixin' up the Govern'ments an' laws as well
took over Washin'ton so we heered tell
an' patched up the crack in the Liberty Bell
Davy, Davy Crockett, seein' his duty clear!

Him an' his jokes travelled all through the land
an' his speeches made him friends to beat the band
His politickin' was their favorite brand
an' everyone wanted to shake his hand
Davy, Davy Crockett, helpin' his legend grow!

He knew when he spoke he sounded the knell
of his hopes for White House an' fame as well
But he spoke out strong so hist'ry books tell
an' patched up the crack in the Liberty Bell
Davy, Davy Crockett, seein' his duty clear!

When he come home his politickin' done
the western march had just begun
So he packed his gear an' his trusty gun
an' lit out grinnin' to follow the sun
Davy, Davy Crockett, leadin' the pioneer!

He heard of Houston an' Austin so
to the Texas plains he jest had to go
Where freedom was fightin' another foe
an' they needed him at the Alamo
Davy, Davy Crockett, the man who don't know fear!

His land is biggest an' his land is best
from grassy plains to the mountain crest
He's ahead of us all meetin' the test
followin' his legend into the West
Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier!

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Here is the best MIDI I could find (there were only two): http://www.bobnholli.com/Stuff/midi/davycroc.mid     Source: http://www.bobnholli.com/Stuff/midi/general_a_d.htm

Here are the  complete lyrics to the famous "Ballad of Davy Crockett: http://www.ntl.matrix.com.br/pfilho/html/lyrics/b/ballad_of_davy_crockett.txt

- Dave Spriggs ('64) of VA - 08/07/08
Thank you so much, Dave!

Image of Coonskin Cap courtesy of http://crockettcoonskincaps.tripod.com/tailcaps.html - 08/16/08

Navy Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.onemileup.com/miniSeals.asp - 05/29/06

Clip art of Frontiersman used to form Divider Lines courtesy of http://www.getyourshirts.com/t-shirts/clipart/pioneer.html - 07/31/08

Animated "NEW" clip art courtesy of http://gifsnow.com/ - 03/07/06

Animated Tiny Birthday Cake clip art courtesy of
Sarah Puckett Kressaty ('65) of VA - 08/31/05
Thanks, Sarah Sugah!

Hampton High School's Crab clip art courtesy of http://www.geocities.com/agent99bm/ - 10/02/05

Navy Seal clip art courtesy of http://www.onemileup.com/miniSeals.asp - 05/29/06

John Marshall High School's Justice Scale clip art courtesy of Cheryl White Wilson (JMHS - '64) of VA - 10/13/05
Thanks, Cheryl!

Marine Corps Seal clip art courtesy of the late Herbert Hice of MI - one of my Famous Marines who served in the South Pacific during WWII.
Thanks again, Herbie!

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